The distance of time

It shocked me last week when historical footage of Sept. 11, 2001, suddenly looked, well, historical.

Eleven years ago, I thought that day never would age, that the film wouldn’t turn grainy and reflective of a decade’s worth of technological improvements in clarity, color and sound.

Yet, as I watched History Channel documentaries on the eleventh anniversary, the archived media reports seemed, all at once, from a different time.

Has it really been 11 years?

What surprised me even more, however, was having a conversation about 9/11 with my almost 12-year-old son, Ford, who had been just a baby when the World Trade Center collapsed…

I reflected on this with him while I drove him to school last Wednesday. He told me that he had gotten up at 5:00 a.m. and watched a documentary about 9/11 on television. My first thought: Who gets up at 5:00 a.m.? My second thought: My kid is old enough to watch the History Channel … voluntarily?

“And what did you think?” I asked him.

“It’s weird that all of it happened when I was a baby,” he said.

via 9/11 documentaries and a new generation — Living — Bangor Daily News — BDN Maine.

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